Canada the Story of Us episode 1 – Worlds Collide pre 1608 to 1759
Canada the Story of Us episode 1

Canada the Story of Us episode 1 – Worlds Collide pre 1608 to 1759

Canada the Story of Us episode 1 – Worlds Collide pre 1608 to 1759: Over 10 hours, the drama-documentary tells the extraordinary tale of some of the people, places and events that shaped Canada — stories of change makers and rule breakers, dreamers and visionaries, scientists and entrepreneurs who forged a nation in a vast and harsh land.

 

 

Hundreds of Indigenous nations with advanced cultures already live in Canada when French and English colonizers arrive and fight for land claims. Indigenous people suffer as a result of first contact.

 

Canada the story of Us episode 1 – Worlds Collide pre 1608 to 1759

 

Over the course of 12,000 years, the North American continent evolves into a place populated by millions of Indigenous people living in hundreds of different nations. These diverse cultures range from the Wendat, a nation of farmers who lived in what is now Southern Ontario, to the Inuit hunters of the far north. These nations have advanced cultures, economies and spiritual traditions. Through diplomacy and trade, these nations grow and thrive on Turtle Island, the continent we now know as North America.

First European settlement 

 

Samuel de Champlain attempts to establish a settlement in Innu territory in 1608. He’s racing against time: if he and his men don’t finish building the settlement before the start of the brutal winter, they will all die. While the settlement is being built, he discovers a conspiracy to assassinate him, orchestrated by Jean Duval.

Desperate to retain control and dissuade any other would-be challengers to his command, Champlain deals out brutal justice, executing Duval. Only seven of Champlain’s original 27-man crew are still alive at the end of the winter. Champlain is successful in completing Habitation, his fortified settlement, which will eventually become Quebec City.

 

The war between the Wendat and the Haudenosaunee 

 

Two of Eastern North America’s most powerful Indigenous confederacies, the Wendat and the Haudenosaunee, are locked in a brutal war for control of the fur trading routes. Chief Oschasteguin, leader of the Wendat Confederacy’s Arendaenronnon nation, decides to enter into an alliance with Champlain and the French settlers.

The French will get the exclusive rights to sell the Wendat’s furs in Europe. In return, the French will supply the Wendat with manpower and weapons in their fight against the Haudenosaunee. One of those weapons is the arquebus, the forerunner to the modern rifle. Champlain uses the arquebus to kill three Haudenosaunee chiefs at a battle in what is now upstate New York, killing two of them with one shot and causing the rest of the Haudenosaunee to retreat. This alliance between settlers of New France and the Wendat will be profitable for both parties — and deadly to their enemies — for years to come.

Wyandot people – Canada the story of Us

The Wyandot people or Wendat, also called the Huron Nation and Huron people, are Iroquoian-speaking peoples of North America who emerged as a tribe around the north shore of Lake Ontario. Today, numerous Wyandot people in the United States are enrolled members of Wyandotte Nation, the federally recognized tribe headquartered in Wyandotte, Oklahoma.[2] In Canada, the Wyandot have a First Nations reserve, Huron-Wendat Nation, in Quebec.

By the 15th century, the precontact Wyandot had settled in the large area from the north shores of most of present-day Lake Ontario, northwards up to the southeastern shores of Georgian Bay. From this homeland, they encountered the French explorer Samuel de Champlain in 1615. They historically spoke the Wyandot language, a Northern Iroquoian language. They were believed to number more than 30,000 at the time of European contact in the 1610s to 1620s.

Haudenosaunee – Canada the story of Us episode 1

The Iroquois are a historical indigenous confederacy in northeast North America. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the Iroquois League, later as the Iroquois Confederacy and to the English as the Five Nations, comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, and Seneca. After 1722, they accepted the Tuscarora people from the southeast into their confederacy, as they were also Iroquoian-speaking, consequently became known as the Six Nations.

The Iroquois have absorbed many other individuals from various peoples into their tribes as a result of warfare, adoption of captives, and by offering shelter to displaced peoples. Culturally, all are considered members of the clans and tribes into which they are adopted by families.

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